Intelligence Community related FAQs

1. What is the intelligence community (IC)?
2. What does the IC protect the United States against?

3. How is intelligence collected?

4. What is counterintelligence?

5. How can I join the intelligence community?   
6. Do I need to be a US citizen to work for the IC?
   
7. What types of tests will I have to take before being accepted into an intelligence agency?

8. What training should I have before applying for an intelligence agency?
9. How old is too old to work for the Intelligence Community?
 
10. What are the most difficult aspects of working for an intelligence agency?

11. Are there specific rules or regulations for employees of the Intelligence Community?

12. What about Intellectual Property violations--how does the Agency view those?

13. I have a tattoo. Will that prohibit me from Agency employment?

14. Question not listed here?

 


1. What is the intelligence community (IC)?

 

The IC is a federation of executive branch agencies and organizations that work separately and together to conduct intelligence activities necessary for the conduct of foreign relations and the protection of the national security of the United States.

  

All 17 Intelligence Community agencies are listed below:

 

Air Force Intelligence

Army Intelligence

Central Intelligence Agency

Coast Guard Intelligence

Defense Intelligence Agency

Department of Energy

Department of Homeland Security

Department of State

Department of the Treasury

Drug Enforcement Administration

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Marine Corps Intelligence

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

National Reconnaissance Office

National Security Agency

Navy Intelligence

Office of the Director of National Intelligence

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2. What does the IC protect the United States against?

 

The threat to the United States that the Intelligence Community must mitigate takes several forms. In addition to conventional military threats that have challenged us in the past, new transnational problems involve the possibilities of terrorism, proliferation, chemical and biological warfare, information infrastructure attack, and narcotics trafficking.

 

3. How is intelligence collected?

 

There are six basic intelligence sources, or collection disciplines:

 

Signals Intelligence (SIGINT)

Imagery Intelligence (IMINT)

Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT)

Human-Source Intelligence (HUMINT)

Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT)

Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT)

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4. What is counterintelligence?

 

Counterintelligence (CI) is the business of identifying and dealing with foreign intelligence threats to the United States and its interests. Its core concern is the intelligence services of foreign states and similar organizations of non-state actors, such as transnational terrorist groups. Counterintelligence has both a defensive mission - protecting the nation's secrets and assets against foreign intelligence penetration - and an offensive mission - finding out what foreign intelligence organizations are planning to better defeat their aims.


5. How can I join the intelligence community?  

Most IC agencies have an online application form that you can download and complete, or complete securely online, and submit electronically. The website will also provide further information about what type of jobs are available in that agency. All IC agencies and their websites are listed here.

6. Do I need to be a US citizen to work for the IC?  

Yes, you must be a citizen of the United States when you apply to work for the IC.Back to Top

7. What types of tests will I have to take before being accepted into an intelligence agency? 

Each agency will have its own battery of tests, but at a minimum an applicant can expect a math and verbal proficiency examination – similar to the SAT college boards. Other tests might include a psychological examination, a language aptitude test, an oral examination before a panel, and/or a polygraph test.

8. What training should I have before applying for an intelligence agency? 

There is no specific course of training for a career in intelligence. Applicants who have foreign area experience and linguistic expertise are highly valued.

9. How old is too old to work for the Intelligence Community? 

There are no age limits, especially for analytical positions. Because of lengthy training and rigorous physical requirements, field agents in the FBI and officers of the National Clandestine Service of the CIA are generally not accepted over the age of 35.
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10. What are the most difficult aspects of working for an intelligence agency? 

Most analysts spend the majority of their careers in the U.S. That said, they do get the opportunity to travel overseas on tours of temporary duty. General administrative jobs at IC agencies are just like any other government job. However, for some in the IC, especially, but not exclusively, those assigned overseas, the job can be 24/7. You are always on-call should a situation arise. At times, it can be difficult to separate your personal from your professional life – particularly in areas of conflict or crisis, man-made or natural.

It’s important to note that not every person in the Intelligence Community (IC) works out in the field. In fact, for every field personnel we employ, we have a huge network of essential support staff behind the scenes. These men and women analyze information, translate foreign language documents, develop new intelligence technology, design software and hardware, write reports for the president, and more. Among the 17 agencies that form the IC, we staff offices in all 50 states and all over the world. This means, wherever you live, there may be an opportunity for you in your own back yard.

One excellent way to get some idea of work in the national security arena is through an internship or summer-only/part time programs in one of the agencies. It can be an effective means to get your foot in the door, gain some experience, and see what working in the IC is actually all about.
Back to Top

11. Are there specific rules or regulations for employees of the Intelligence Community? 

Employees of the IC are employees of the federal government and fall under the regulations administered by the U.S. Office of Personnel. In addition, each IC agency has its own specific regulations regarding the personal conduct of its employees.

12. What about Intellectual Property violations--how does the Agency view those? 

The theft of copyrighted material has grown substantially in recent years and, like any other criminal activity, is of concern to the Agency. Illegal downloading, use, distribution, or sale of songs, games, software, and other electronic files will be carefully evaluated during security processing. While factors such as the amount, frequency, retention, and recency of such downloading activity will be taken into consideration, applicants are reminded that the theft of copyrighted material may be disqualifying for Agency employment.

13. I have a tattoo. Will that prohibit me from Agency employment? 

Tattoos will not disqualify you from gaining employment at the CIA, and all professionally-qualified persons are encouraged to apply.Back to Top

14. Question not listed here?

Please contact Jason Darensburg at 277-3223 or jdarrens@unm.edu, or come by NSSP Office at #3019 Mesa Vista Hall, UNM Main campus.

All information given above has been retrieved from different IC agencies’ websites and publications.

 

What is the intelligence community (IC)?

 

The IC is a federation of executive branch agencies and organizations that work separately and together to conduct intelligence activities necessary for the conduct of foreign relations and the protection of the national security of the United States.

 

All 17 Intelligence Community agencies are listed below:

 

1.      Air Force Intelligence

2.      Army Intelligence

3.      Central Intelligence Agency

4.      Coast Guard Intelligence

5.      Defense Intelligence Agency

6.      Department of Energy

7.      Department of Homeland Security

8.      Department of State

9.      Department of the Treasury

10.   Drug Enforcement Administration

11.   Federal Bureau of Investigation

12.   Marine Corps Intelligence

13.   National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

14.   National Reconnaissance Office

15.   National Security Agency

16.   Navy Intelligence

17.   Office of the Director of National Intelligence

 

What does the IC protect the United States against?

 

The threat to the United States that the Intelligence Community must mitigate takes several forms. In addition to conventional military threats that have challenged us in the past, new transnational problems involve the possibilities of terrorism, proliferation, chemical and biological warfare, information infrastructure attack, and narcotics trafficking.

 

How is intelligence collected?

 

There are six basic intelligence sources, or collection disciplines:

 

Signals Intelligence (SIGINT)

Imagery Intelligence (IMINT)

Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT)

Human-Source Intelligence (HUMINT)

Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT)

Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT)

 

What is counterintelligence?

 

Counterintelligence (CI) is the business of identifying and dealing with foreign intelligence threats to the United States and its interests. Its core concern is the intelligence services of foreign states and similar organizations of non-state actors, such as transnational terrorist groups. Counterintelligence has both a defensive mission - protecting the nation's secrets and assets against foreign intelligence penetration - and an offensive mission - finding out what foreign intelligence organizations are planning to better defeat their aims.

How can I join the intelligence community?  

Most IC agencies have an online application form that you can download and complete, or complete securely online, and submit electronically. The website will also provide further information about what type of jobs are available in that agency. All IC agencies and their websites are listed here.

Do I need to be a US citizen to work for the IC?  

Yes, you must be a citizen of the United States when you apply to work for the IC.

What types of tests will I have to take before being accepted into an intelligence agency? 

Each agency will have its own battery of tests, but at a minimum an applicant can expect a math and verbal proficiency examination – similar to the SAT college boards. Other tests might include a psychological examination, a language aptitude test, an oral examination before a panel, and/or a polygraph test.

What training should I have before applying for an intelligence agency? 

There is no specific course of training for a career in intelligence. Applicants who have foreign area experience and linguistic expertise are highly valued.

How old is too old to work for the Intelligence Community? 

There are no age limits, especially for analytical positions. Because of lengthy training and rigorous physical requirements, field agents in the FBI and officers of the National Clandestine Service of the CIA are generally not accepted over the age of 35.

What are the most difficult aspects of working for an intelligence agency? 

Most analysts spend the majority of their careers in the U.S. That said, they do get the opportunity to travel overseas on tours of temporary duty. General administrative jobs at IC agencies are just like any other government job. However, for some in the IC, especially, but not exclusively, those assigned overseas, the job can be 24/7. You are always on-call should a situation arise. At times, it can be difficult to separate your personal from your professional life – particularly in areas of conflict or crisis, man-made or natural.

It’s important to note that not every person in the Intelligence Community (IC) works out in the field. In fact, for every field personnel we employ, we have a huge network of essential support staff behind the scenes. These men and women analyze information, translate foreign language documents, develop new intelligence technology, design software and hardware, write reports for the president, and more.

Among the 17 agencies that form the IC, we staff offices in all 50 states and all over the world. This means, wherever you live, there may be an opportunity for you in your own back yard.

One excellent way to get some idea of work in the national security arena is through an internship or summer-only/part time programs in one of the agencies. It can be an effective means to get your foot in the door, gain some experience, and see what working in the IC is actually all about. 

6. Are there specific rules or regulations for employees of the Intelligence Community? 

Employees of the IC are employees of the federal government and fall under the regulations administered by the U.S. Office of Personnel. In addition, each IC agency has its own specific regulations regarding the personal conduct of its employees.

What about Intellectual Property violations--how does the Agency view those? 

The theft of copyrighted material has grown substantially in recent years and, like any other criminal activity, is of concern to the Agency. Illegal downloading, use, distribution, or sale of songs, games, software, and other electronic files will be carefully evaluated during security processing. While factors such as the amount, frequency, retention, and recency of such downloading activity will be taken into consideration, applicants are reminded that the theft of copyrighted material may be disqualifying for Agency employment.

I have a tattoo. Will that prohibit me from Agency employment? 

Tattoos will not disqualify you from gaining employment at the CIA, and all professionally-qualified persons are encouraged to apply.

The information given above has been retrieved from different IC agencies’ websites.

 

What is the intelligence community (IC)?

 

The IC is a federation of executive branch agencies and organizations that work separately and together to conduct intelligence activities necessary for the conduct of foreign relations and the protection of the national security of the United States.

 

All 17 Intelligence Community agencies are listed below:

 

1.      Air Force Intelligence

2.      Army Intelligence

3.      Central Intelligence Agency

4.      Coast Guard Intelligence

5.      Defense Intelligence Agency

6.      Department of Energy

7.      Department of Homeland Security

8.      Department of State

9.      Department of the Treasury

10.   Drug Enforcement Administration

11.   Federal Bureau of Investigation

12.   Marine Corps Intelligence

13.   National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

14.   National Reconnaissance Office

15.   National Security Agency

16.   Navy Intelligence

17.   Office of the Director of National Intelligence

 

What does the IC protect the United States against?

 

The threat to the United States that the Intelligence Community must mitigate takes several forms. In addition to conventional military threats that have challenged us in the past, new transnational problems involve the possibilities of terrorism, proliferation, chemical and biological warfare, information infrastructure attack, and narcotics trafficking.

 

How is intelligence collected?

 

There are six basic intelligence sources, or collection disciplines:

 

Signals Intelligence (SIGINT)

Imagery Intelligence (IMINT)

Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT)

Human-Source Intelligence (HUMINT)

Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT)

Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT)

 

What is counterintelligence?

 

Counterintelligence (CI) is the business of identifying and dealing with foreign intelligence threats to the United States and its interests. Its core concern is the intelligence services of foreign states and similar organizations of non-state actors, such as transnational terrorist groups. Counterintelligence has both a defensive mission - protecting the nation's secrets and assets against foreign intelligence penetration - and an offensive mission - finding out what foreign intelligence organizations are planning to better defeat their aims.

How can I join the intelligence community?  

Most IC agencies have an online application form that you can download and complete, or complete securely online, and submit electronically. The website will also provide further information about what type of jobs are available in that agency. All IC agencies and their websites are listed here.

Do I need to be a US citizen to work for the IC?  

Yes, you must be a citizen of the United States when you apply to work for the IC.

What types of tests will I have to take before being accepted into an intelligence agency?

Each agency will have its own battery of tests, but at a minimum an applicant can expect a math and verbal proficiency examination – similar to the SAT college boards. Other tests might include a psychological examination, a language aptitude test, an oral examination before a panel, and/or a polygraph test.

What training should I have before applying for an intelligence agency?

There is no specific course of training for a career in intelligence. Applicants who have foreign area experience and linguistic expertise are highly valued.

How old is too old to work for the Intelligence Community?

There are no age limits, especially for analytical positions. Because of lengthy training and rigorous physical requirements, field agents in the FBI and officers of the National Clandestine Service of the CIA are generally not accepted over the age of 35.

What are the most difficult aspects of working for an intelligence agency?

Most analysts spend the majority of their careers in the U.S. That said, they do get the opportunity to travel overseas on tours of temporary duty. General administrative jobs at IC agencies are just like any other government job. However, for some in the IC, especially, but not exclusively, those assigned overseas, the job can be 24/7. You are always on-call should a situation arise. At times, it can be difficult to separate your personal from your professional life – particularly in areas of conflict or crisis, man-made or natural.

It’s important to note that not every person in the Intelligence Community (IC) works out in the field. In fact, for every field personnel we employ, we have a huge network of essential support staff behind the scenes. These men and women analyze information, translate foreign language documents, develop new intelligence technology, design software and hardware, write reports for the president, and more.

Among the 17 agencies that form the IC, we staff offices in all 50 states and all over the world. This means, wherever you live, there may be an opportunity for you in your own back yard.

One excellent way to get some idea of work in the national security arena is through an internship or summer-only/part time programs in one of the agencies. It can be an effective means to get your foot in the door, gain some experience, and see what working in the IC is actually all about.

6. Are there specific rules or regulations for employees of the Intelligence Community?

Employees of the IC are employees of the federal government and fall under the regulations administered by the U.S. Office of Personnel. In addition, each IC agency has its own specific regulations regarding the personal conduct of its employees.

What about Intellectual Property violations--how does the Agency view those?

The theft of copyrighted material has grown substantially in recent years and, like any other criminal activity, is of concern to the Agency. Illegal downloading, use, distribution, or sale of songs, games, software, and other electronic files will be carefully evaluated during security processing. While factors such as the amount, frequency, retention, and recency of such downloading activity will be taken into consideration, applicants are reminded that the theft of copyrighted material may be disqualifying for Agency employment.

I have a tattoo. Will that prohibit me from Agency employment?

Tattoos will not disqualify you from gaining employment at the CIA, and all professionally-qualified persons are encouraged to apply.

The information given above has been retrieved from different IC agencies’ websites.